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Message to Washington's "Very Serious People" Regarding Tom Steyer's Climate, Clean Energy Efforts

2 min. read

Next time Washington's VSPs ("Very Serious People") say that Tom Steyer hasn't successfully focused on climate change and energy, they should read this.

....even if Dems lose the Senate, there may be one bright spot: Liberals may have made a bit of headway in forcing climate change on to the national agenda.

In the Senate race that may have focused more than any other on climate change — in Michigan — the Democrat appears on track for a sizable win. And today’s New York Times has a great piece detailing the surprising degree to which the environment and climate have emerged as issues in multiple Senate campaigns...

...The mere act of injecting climate into the political dialogue — even if it doesn’t have much of an impact this year — is itself a step forward. And the issue could matter in the coming presidential race. For one thing, climate change is a priority for the constituencies that are increasingly important to the new coalition that fueled Obama’s popular vote win in the last two presidential elections — and among which Republicans will need to broaden their appeal. A recent Pew poll found that huge majorities of young voters, nonwhites, and college educated whites believe there is solid evidence of global warming.

Speaking of polling, this post lists a slew of polling indicating strong, majority support support among Americans for slashing carbon pollution from power plants, "even if it meant their energy expenses would rise." Does this have anything to do with the fact that "Tom Steyer’s group is spending enormous sums on climate ads, specifically in key presidential swing states like Colorado, Florida, Iowa, and Michigan?" Perhaps Steyer's ads are also capitalizing on Americans' support for a transition off of dirty, polluting energy? Either way, it's great news, and Steyer deserves a serious round of applause, and a hearty "thank you!", for his efforts.

Topics: Clean Economy