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Jayesh Goyal of Younicos Examines Impact of Explosive EV Growth

Over at Renewable Energy World, Jayesh Goyal of Younicos has an interesting article examining the growth in electric vehicles (EVs) and the potential impact of this growth on C&I energy managers. According to Goyal, “C&I energy managers will want to keep an eye on EV growth, because five accelerating trends could put EV impacts right on the driveway of the way they operate.” The five trends Goyal identifies are:

  • The explosive growth in EVs – “Analysts estimate that the U.S. will have more than 11 million EVs on the road by 2025 — compared to just about half a million as of the end of 2016.”
  • The potential impacts of EV growth on the electric grid – “Analysts say that, under any growth scenario, EV integration with other technologies is critical to accommodate a changing grid.”
  • The increased need for commercial and industrial (C&I) energy managers “to build EV charging stations to accommodate employees and customers, while enhancing their core business.”
  • The potential for “multi-use battery energy storage systems…to address some of the thorniest C&I problems, such as ensuring the stability of increasingly complex power systems.”
  • The potential for EVs to become the “’Swiss army knife’ of the power grid…due to the flexibility and adaptability of smart storage, which provides grid resiliency to a wide range of stakeholders, including C&I users.”

Goyal concludes that “EVs will be bringing major changes to transportation and power infrastructure, as well as to the ways that C&I energy managers do their jobs,” and that “[w]ise C&I energy managers will keep an eye on how that change is driving towards them and take a leadership role in addressing it.“

What Jayesh Goyal is saying here makes a great deal of sense. We’d simply add that the C&I space continues to be an appealing growth market for cleantech providers, whether they be energy storage (or solar + energy storage) companies, solar OEMs or wind OEMs and developers. 

Topics: Clean Economy